Children See. Children Learn.

Contents

I Introduction
II Background
III Campaign Strategies
IV Events
V Key Organizations
VI Positive Discipline Parenting Programs
VII References

--Submitted by Louise Choquette, Bilingual Health Promotion Consultant, Best Start Resource Centre, Health Nexus

I Introduction

The Best Start Resource Centre has launched an awareness campaign on child discipline. At the heart of this campaign is the website http://www.ChildrenSeeChildrenLearn.ca, which emphasizes the importance of role modeling for parents. It offers parents many suggestions to help them guide their child from birth to age six. The website has eight short video clips. Four of these videos share suggestions to guide children in a positive way and comments from experts.The videos show real-life situations that were filmed with families from Ontario. The other four videos offer tips from parents who have young children. All the videos can be shared through online social networks.

II Background

To ensure this campaign is evidence-based, the background research that was completed to guide this campaign on child discipline included:

  • Interviews with 18 experts in the field of child discipline.
  • An environmental scan of other campaigns on the topic of child discipline and a review of available campaign evaluation data.
  • A literature review of current research related to child discipline. Research clearly showed the negative, long-term impact of physical and emotional punishment. Alternative best practices were reviewed to help define effective strategies.
  • A needs assessment of service providers who work in maternal child health to define the most effective ways to reach parents.
  • A survey (http://www.beststart.org/resources/hlthy_chld_dev/BSRC_Child_Discipline_...) of 500 Ontario parents of children aged zero to six years old to assess their attitudes, behaviours and needs regarding child discipline. The majority of parents reported that, at least once a week, they got annoyed with their child and lost their temper. Twenty-six percent (26%) of parents slapped or spanked their children at least occasionally. The survey revealed that fathers generally had more negative behaviours than mothers regarding child discipline (fathers were more likely to say they slapped/spanked, less likely to be aware of the negative consequences of punishment, and more likely to believe in strict discipline, etc.). The survey results emphasized that all parents need help in finding positive ways to guide their children. Based on the parent survey, the top sources of parenting information and influence for parents were:
    • Family/friends/colleagues
    • Internet (information websites)
    • Childcare provider/teacher
    • Health care provider.

Parents of young children indicated that they like to learn about parenting using interactive websites. http://www.ChildrenSeeChildrenLearn.ca has been designed with the needs of busy parents in mind. The website is easy to navigate and the videos are interesting. Special attention was given to ensure fathers were well represented in the videos. An advisory committee of key stakeholders and experts in child development guided the development of the website. Many parents tested the website and said they found it very useful.

Additional information on the development of the campaign is available at http://en.beststart.org/services/campaigns/child-discipline-campaign-cam....

III Campaign Strategies

A number of promotional strategies have been developed for service providers, to direct parents to this website:

The Best Start Resource Centre would like to encourage service providers to include information about the campaign in their newsletters, on their websites and to promote it to their local media. They can also offer short parent workshops using the ready-to-use workshop (http://www.beststart.org/cgi-bin/commerce.cgi?preadd=action&key=K56-B)

All the promotional materials can be downloaded and ordered from http://en.beststart.org/services/campaigns/child-discipline-campaign-cam....

IV Events

V Key Organizations

  • Child Welfare League of Canada. The voice for vulnerable children in Canada. One of their key publications is Be the Best Parent You Can Be: Why Positive Discipline Works, available in many languages. www.cwlc.ca
  • Committee on the Rights of the Child – United Nations Human Rights. The role of this international organization is to monitor the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child by all countries who have ratified it. www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/CRC
  • National Association for Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect. The focus of this Australia-based organization is to bring about the changes necessary in individual and community behaviour to stop child abuse and neglect before it starts. Their website contains posters, brochures, web banners and videos. www.napcan.org.au
  • US Alliance to End the Hitting of Children. An organizing movement, vying to increase the strength of organizations committed to ending corporal punishment of children. Its website has a number of downloadable resources, including research, videos, pictures, pamphlets, etc. www.endhittingusa.org

VI Positive Discipline Parenting Programs

  • Nobody’s Perfect. A parenting education and support program for parents of children from birth to age five. It is designed to meet the needs of parents who are young, single, socially or geographically isolated or who have low income or limited formal education. http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/hp-ps/dca-dea/parent/nobody-personne
  • Positive Discipline in Everyday Parenting. A parent support program developed by Dr. Joan Durrant and Save the Children that helps parents gradually move away from physical and emotional punishment and toward solutions that nurture their children’s healthy development and learning. http://www.positivedisciplineeveryday.com  
  • The Incredible Years. The Incredible Years Program is a series of evidence-based programs for parents, children, and teachers. The goal is to prevent and treat young children's behavior problems and promote their social, emotional, and academic competence. http://incredibleyears.com  
  • Triple P. Programs that give parents simple and practical strategies to help them confidently manage their children’s behaviour, prevent problems developing and build strong, healthy relationships. http://www.triplep.net

VII References

Australian Association for Infant Mental Health. (2009). Position Paper 3: Time Out. Retrieved from http://www.aaimhi.org/inewsfiles/Position Paper 3.pdf

Durrant, J.E., Ensom, R., and Coalition on Physical Punishment of Children and Youth. (2004). Joint Statement on Physical Punishment of Children and Youth. Ottawa: Coalition on Physical Punishment of Children and Youth. Retrieved from http://www.cheo.on.ca/en/physicalpunishment.

Gershoff, E.T. (2010). More Harm Than Good: A Summary of Scientific Research on the Intended and Unintended Effects of Corporal Punishment on Children. Law and Contemporary Problems. 73(2):31-56. Retrieved from http://scholarship.law.duke.edu/lcp/vol73/iss2/3

Global Initiative to End Corporal Punishment of Children. (2013). Review of Research on the Effects of Corporal Punishment: Working Paper. Retrieved from http://www.endcorporalpunishment.org/research/impact-corporal-punishment...