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2007-501

This week's feature article from Susan Snelling on the working poor population of Greater Sudbury–and public health’s response–is timely: the Ontario government announced that it will increase the minimum wage to $8.00 as of February 1, 2007. The move has provoked a debate about what constitutes a “living wage” and whether raising the minimum wage is good or bad for business and the economy. The Sudbury & District Public Health unit partnered with researchers from Laurentian University and the University of Toronto to get a better look at the low-wage earners in their own community and the project is profiled in "A Needs Assessment of Sudbury’s Working Poor Population."

volume: 
2007
number: 
501
pubdate: 
20070208
published: 
eid: 
501

Needs Assessment of Sudbury’s Working Poor Population

Sections: 

Contents

I Background
II Method
III Key Findings
IV Implications for Practice
V Conclusion
VI References

-- by Susan Snelling, Manager of Research and Evaluation, Sudbury & District Health Unit (SDHU); Michèle Parent, Public Health Consultant, (SDHU) and School of Nursing, Laurentian University; Marie Laframboise, Public Health Nurse, SDHU; and the Working Poor Project Steering Committee,

Data were provided by the Working Poor Project, which is led by the Sudbury & District Health Unit Public Health Research, Education, and Development (PHRED) Program, and the Workplace Wellness Team, and Laurentian University faculty.

Health Canada Headlines for January 2007

Sections: 

1. Minister Clement Announces Expansion of Hospital-Based Smoking Cessation Programs
2. Health Minister Tony Clement supports Tanzania's efforts to train cancer specialists
3. Health Canada undertakes on-line consultations on a commission for mental health and mental illness in Canada
4. Canada's New Government announces pilot project for wait times
5. Health Minister Clement Announces Financial Support for the Kateri Memorial Hospital Centre Expension Project in Kahnawake

New Aboriginal Mental Health Framework Launched

Sections: 

On February 1, the Alberta Mental Health Board (AMHB), in cooperation with the AMHB Wisdom Committee, launched Aboriginal Mental Health: A Framework for Alberta, which gives strategic direction on how to address Aboriginal mental health issues. The framework is accompanied by Aboriginal Research Protocols, a guideline on how to work with Aboriginal people in a way that is respectful of protocol when conducting research.

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