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Implementing THCU's Twelve Steps--Project Breakthrough: A Campaign to Reduce Stigma Attached to Mental Illnesses from the Canadian Psychiatric Research Foundation



I Introduction



Mental illness includes many types of mental disorders including schizophrenia, major depression, panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, bipolar disorder (manic depression), addictions, and eating disorders. People who suffer from mental illnesses are disadvantaged by a lack of research funding as well as a lack of compassion, understanding, and community resolve to assist them in coping with their illness. The Canadian Psychiatric Research Foundation (CPRF) is a national charitable organization founded in 1980 to raise and distribute funds for psychiatric research and awareness in Canada. CPRF supports long-term solutions to the enormous problem of mental illness. However, for 22 years, CPRF has struggled to raise awareness about the need for psychiatric research funding.

II Background



Mental illness includes many types of mental disorders including schizophrenia, major depression, panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, bipolar disorder (manic depression), addictions, and eating disorders. People who suffer from mental illnesses are disadvantaged by a lack of research funding as well as a lack of compassion, understanding, and community resolve to assist them in coping with their illness. The Canadian Psychiatric Research Foundation (CPRF) is a national charitable organization founded in 1980 to raise and distribute funds for psychiatric research and awareness in Canada. CPRF supports long-term solutions to the enormous problem of mental illness. However, for 22 years, CPRF has struggled to raise awareness about the need for psychiatric research funding.



III Step One: Project Management



Time Management



Groundwork for the campaign began in July 2002. The campaign materials were produced during August and September 2002 for the launch in October 2002. All planning, including design and pre-testing, were completed within three months. Pre-campaign evaluation was done in October 2002 and post-campaign evaluations were done in June 2003.



Money and Other Resources



CPRF had no money to spend on a communication campaign. The entire effort was done on a pro bono basis. Various volunteer CPRF board members and Vickers & Benson Arnold, now known as Arnold Worldwide, a creative advertising agency, worked together to create ads and secure free media airtime and space. Several TV channels and other media organizations donated space and airtime.



With regards to staff time, Judy Hills, the executive director of CPRF, spent half of each day on the campaign for three months. CPRF's other two staff members helped with administrative duties. Arnold Worldwide also recruited more than 400 volunteers to assist with the production of TV, radio, and print ads.



Stakeholder Participation



CPRF's voluntary board of directors, comprised of senior business and community leaders, and a professional advisory board of senior Canadian researchers provided input throughout the campaign development process. Ad agency Arnold Worldwide developed the campaign creative and Warwick Public Relations helped with the public/media relations aspects of the campaign, also for free.



Decision-Making Process



CPRF board members reserved the right to approve or veto campaign-related activities and materials, including the creative. However, it was one board member and Judy Hills who worked closely with the creative agency on a regular basis.



Data Gathering and Interpretation



A pre-campaign survey was conducted in October 2002 by Thompson Lightstone. The questions were added to an omnibus survey. The data that was collected from the survey was reported to Arnold Worldwide and informed development of the creative. Due to limited resources, CPRF did not gather any other data.



IV Step Two: Revisit Health Promotion Strategy



CPRF's Project Breakthrough included the following three components:



1. Communications Campaign

2. Fundraising Campaign

3. Political Support Initiative



The communications campaign was proposed to heighten interest in the plight of the mentally ill and the discrimination they face in society. It was hoped that this increased interest would provide "a window of opportunity" to boost fundraising for psychiatric research and increase political support for the issue.



V Step Three: Audience Analysis and Segmentation



The audience was chosen based on CPRF's 22 years of experience as well as opinions obtained from organizations like the Heart and Stroke Foundation, Canadian Cancer Society, and other agencies that have experience with stigma-related advertising.



CPRF volunteers and staff have encountered many examples of stigma such as

employees fearing to reveal an illness to their human resource professionals,

parents referring to a child's suicide as "an accident,"

companies preferring to be listed as "anonymous" on a list of donors to mental-illness related causes,

mental-illness facility/organization employees preferring not to list their places of employment on home rental applications,

mental health organizations being denied office space, and

resistance by medical students to specialize in psychiatric research.



CPRF volunteers and staff also feel that most Canadian adults have little knowledge about mental illness and hold stereotypical images of the mentally ill in their minds (for example, loonies wandering the streets in their pajamas yelling at newspaper boxes).



CPRF felt that the presence of this stigma was limiting donations for psychiatric research. Although most donors to CPRF are older adults, because of the wide range of audiences affected by the types of stigma listed above the target audience chosen for the campaign was the general public over age 25.



Due to time and financial limitations, no audience analysis data was collected.



VI Step Four: Communication Inventory



Following a casual meeting between Arnold Worldwide and one of CPRF's board members, Arnold Worldwide agreed to develop the creative and assist with implementation, for free. The staff of Arnold Worldwide used their existing relationships to acquire free services and advertising time/space.



VII Step Five: Set Communication Objectives



Individual

To decrease the stigma associated with mental illness in the general public over age 25 years

To increase awareness in the general public over age 25 that mental illness research is severely underfunded

To increase awareness about CPRF in the general public over age 25 so that public will be aware of CPRF when asked for donations



Network

To increase the number of students in medical school who are involved in psychiatry research



Societal

To increase government support for increasing financial resources in the healthcare system for the mentally ill



VIII Step Six: Select Channels and Vehicles



CPRF implemented a multimedia campaign that included print, radio, and TV ads. Other printed campaign materials included brochures and press kits. The campaign resources including the audio-visual ads were available electronically on the CPRF website at http://www.cprf.ca.



IX Step Seven: Combine and Sequence



The campaign was launched during the week of October 14, 2002, to build on Mental Illness Awareness Week, which was the week prior. Since media airtime and space were donated, CPRF could not follow a fixed timeline. The ads appeared as and when space and time were available.



Table 1: Campaign Timeline, is available in the PDF version of the case study on www.thcu.ca



X Step Eight: Develop Messages



CPRF decided on the following key elements to be included in the campaign message:



Table 2: Message Elements



What

a. Mental illnesses are at "epidemic proportions" in Canada; in fact one in five suffers from a mental disorder. In any given year, 37.5% of Canadians suffer from some form of mental disorder.

b. One in eight Canadians will be hospitalized for mental illness at some point in his/her life.

c. Mental illness is a legitimate medical condition, not a character flaw. However, the stigma and discrimination attached to mental illnesses create a situation where mental illness is kept in the closet.

d. Mental health care accounts for as much as 16% of healthcare costs, yet only five million of the 500 million dollars allocated for medical research goes to psychiatric research.

e. Many mental illnesses currently respond well to medical intervention.

f. Other medical interventions are possible and needed.



So what

a. Uncontrolled/untreated mental illness comes with enormous costs to the economy and society. Health Canada estimates the annual economic burden of mental illness to be more than $13 billion per year.

b. Given the prevalence, you, or someone you know may now or in the future be challenged by a mental illness. Nearly 4,000 Canadians die by suicide each year.



Now what

a. Acknowledge that, like any serious affliction, people with mental illness can't get better by themselves.

b. Donate to the Canadian Psychiatric Research Foundation to help research mental illnesses in the hope of finding cures.



XI Step Nine: Develop Identity



The logo of the CPRF appeared on all campaign resources.



XII Step Ten: Production



CPRF provided Arnold Worldwide with information about mental illness statistics, opinions on target audiences, and creative ideas obtained from organizations such as Heart and Stroke Foundation, Canadian Cancer Society, and other agencies that had experience with stigma-related advertising.



In addition to the information noted above in Step 8, CPRF produced the following creative brief:

Creative needs to have high impact and be emotionally evocative

a. to challenge people's existing perceptions by juxtaposing judgmental views about mental illness with the compassionate and understanding attitudes that surround other devastating afflictions such as being hit by a car, cancer or heart disease

b. to get media to want to donate quality space/air time

c. to garner pro bono support (i.e., people wanting to get involved for personal reasons)

d. so that production suppliers want to be associated with creative and donate their time/resources

e. to stand out from PSA clutter

f. to get public relations coverage



The above needs were translated by Arnold Worldwide into the creative idea "Mental illness is a real disease so why don't we treat it seriously." The campaign slogans, "Mental illness is real. Help find a cure" and "Imagine if we treated everyone like we treat the mentally ill," combined with the visual elements of the creative, were developed to communicate this creative idea. The tone was intended to be informed, provocative, challenging, unpatronizing, and empathetic.



In order to provide media with the flexibility to use the campaign lines within any available time and space, Arnold Worldwide produced three different print ads, a 30-second and a 60-second TV ad, and three different radio commercials, each with a 30-second and 60-second version. All the campaign materials were produced during August and September 2002 for the October launch following Mental Awareness Week. Print ads were also produced in French. Arnold Worldwide also recruited production companies, talent, and other suppliers.



XIII Step Eleven: Implementation



The multimedia campaign consisting of print, television, and radio ads was launched nationwide the week of October 14, 2002, in 43 radio stations, popular TV channels, and consumer and business magazines. The French print ads also went out in October. The date was chosen to build on Mental Illness Awareness Week, which started on October 7.



Since media space and airtime were donated, ad placement was determined by individual channels and stations as space/time was available. Arnold Worldwide coordinated the ad placements with the help of the board of directors. There was an initial surge in the placement of ads from October to December 2002, after which the ads continued to run in assorted magazines throughout 2003 and 2004 as space and airtime were available. The campaign appeared not only in Canada but also in few US states.



The following organizations donated pro bono space and time:

Communications-Southside Studios, Radke Films, Powerhouse Casting, School Editing, Crush, Manta, Keen Music, Guerilla TV, Warwick Public Relations, and Thompson Lightstone & Company

Media-CanWest Global Communications Corp. (print, TV and online support), Rogers Media Inc. (print, radio and TV support), Toronto Star Newspapers Ltd., The Globe and Mail Ltd, Time Canada Ltd., Canadian Business Media Ltd; Relevant Communications Inc, Grassroots, Multi-Vision Publishing Inc, and TransContinental Yorkville



Warwick Public Relations developed a public/media relations strategy in order to maximize the advertising message through editorial coverage. Press kits that were distributed to media during the week of Oct 14 included a news release, backgrounder on CPRF, FAQ sheet on CPRF, fundraising information, samples of print ads, and a bio on the executive chairperson on the CPRF board.



CPRF also provided speakers for interviews on radio and TV and for editorials, articles, etc. Interviews were requested by the media stations in response to the media releases. Profiles of mental illnesses were produced by members of CPRF's Professional Advisory Board and Arnold Worldwide. Illnesses like postpartum depression, schizophrenia, and other mood disorders were profiled as requested.



Table 3: Campaign Overview, is available in the PDF ...]



XIV Step Twelve: Evaluation



Formative Evaluation



In October 2002, Thompson Lightstone did a pre-campaign survey of attitudes and awareness by adding questions to an omnibus survey. The report went to Arnold Worldwide and informed the creative development.



Due to limited time and budgets, additional formative evaluation activities like creative pre-testing were limited to obtaining opinions from the Heart and Stroke Foundation, Canadian Cancer Society, the Rick Hansen Institute, and other organizations that had experience with stigma-related advertising. CPRF approached these organizations for general advice as well as input on the appropriateness of the ads. The organizations understood what CPRF wanted to do but cautioned that the ads might get negative responses.



Process Evaluation



The public response to the campaign was mostly favorable but in some cases negative. For instance, Canadian Cancer Society wrote to CPRF on behalf of one of their members who felt offended at the comparison between cancer and mental illness. On a similar note, CBC refused to run the TV commercial calling it very "violent." However, the overall outcomes were positive (please see the section on summative evaluation below).



CPRF tried to use Nielson ratings (which estimate audience numbers for TV programs) to determine when and where the ads were screened. However, detailed information was not available. Nielson confirmed that CPRF ads were also running in few US states, including New Jersey, Washington, and Ohio.



Since November 2002, the following groups and individuals within the mental illness/health sector have called to congratulate CPRF and to request permission to use the campaign in their efforts to eradicate stigma. Even emergency room personnel in British Columbia and Ontario contacted CPRF to ask for ads that could be placed in emergency rooms to boost morale of psychiatric nurses and to reinforce that administering emergency services to a mentally ill patient is critical.



Mental Health Groups Wanting to Use Ads



Schizophrenia Society of Canada - National (BC, Saskatchewan, Manitoba)

Canadian Mental Health Association

Hospital Emergency Rooms - British Columbia Ontario

Nursing associations

Aboriginal health groups

Nortel: Occupational Health Nurse

Doctors' offices

National Association for Mental Illness (NAMI - USA)

Youth Group (YEAH) in British Columbia

Parents Life Line of Eastern Ontario

ABC Canada



The Canadian military launched a program to help personnel suffering from post-traumatic stress syndrome and other mental illnesses. CPRF was asked to work with them on anti-stigma initiatives.

The campaign also improved the CPRF's credibility in the mental health research community. Below are few accomplishments:

CPRF's radio ad "911" won a United Nations Department of Public Information Award.

CPRF was asked to prepare a brief for the Senate - The Standing Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology - Mental Health and Mental Illness.

CPRF was approached to join several coalitions working to increase attention to mental illness and mental health promotion at all levels of Canadian society.

The media calls for information and access to researchers increased dramatically and CPRF is referred to in articles about mental illness.

Institute for Neurosciences, Mental Health and Addiction became a partner in the campaign.

Canadian Psychiatric Association presented the 2002 Mental Illness Awareness Week Award to CPRF for the innovative ad campaign.

The radio ads won a One Show Silver Pencil Award and a New York Festival Radio Gold Award.



Another positive side benefit of the campaign was that students from the Rotman School of Business and the College of Art & Design came together in spring 2004 to work on a follow-up campaign for CPRF, which could build on the existing campaign.



Summative Evaluation



The most important outcome of the campaign was that CPRF started receiving phone calls and emails pledging support and donations as soon as the campaign was launched. In addition, Kaleidovision conducted a post-campaign research study in June 2003 using both qualitative and quantitative methods to determine campaign effectiveness. The study was done pro bono.



Kaleidovision assembled 79 (74% female; 26% male) voluntary participants for the study; 49% were under 40 years of age while the rest were 40 or above.



The quantitative aspect of the study involved a set of questions on campaign exposure and perceived effectiveness. Participants were shown the ads and then they responded to questions using a hand-held electronic device. Responses were as follows:

33% of the participants claimed that they were aware of at least one ad, usually a TV ad

38% felt that the campaign would have an extremely strong impact

38% felt that it would have a strong impact

49% felt that it forced people to think and re-evaluate their feelings and perspective about mental illness; 91% agreed it is "very important to get this message out"

78% agreed that the campaign did a good job of getting the message across

68% felt the campaign was informative

92% felt it was interesting

96% felt it was attention getting

82% felt it was shocking but appropriate



On all dimensions, the exceptionally few negative responses were all linked to a resistance to the shock, a personal distaste.



Qualitative focus group data was also collected. The same 79 people participated. Participants were split roughly 50/50 on whether they felt funds generated from the campaign should be used for research or for helping victims. Most felt funding for this issue should be a joint responsibility of government/charitable organizations.



Some of the participant comments are shown below:

"I felt humble and a little guilty."

"It makes us aware there is a continuing prejudice ongoing. We should do something to limit this."

"This campaign is dynamite. It jolts us into reality."

"A good way of portraying the lack of care."

"Although the ads are humorous they made me very sad.an excellent way of getting the message across."



XV For More Information



For more information about Project Breakthrough, please contact



Judy Hills

Executive Director

Canadian Psychiatric Research Foundation

2 Carlton Street, Suite 1007

Toronto, ON M5B 1J3



Phone: 416.351.7757

Fax: 416.351.7765

[email protected]

http://www.cprf.ca



For more information about THCUs Case Study Series, please contact....

II Step One: Project Management



* Time Management

Groundwork for the campaign began in July 2002. The campaign materials were produced during August and September 2002 for the launch in October 2002. All planning, including design and pre-testing, were completed within three months. Pre-campaign evaluation was done in October 2002 and post-campaign evaluations were done in June 2003.



* Money and Other Resources

CPRF had no money to spend on a communication campaign. The entire effort was done on a pro bono basis. Various volunteer CPRF board members and Vickers & Benson Arnold, now known as Arnold Worldwide, a creative advertising agency, worked together to create ads and secure free media airtime and space. Several TV channels and other media organizations donated space and airtime. With regards to staff time, Judy Hills, the executive director of CPRF, spent half of each day on the campaign for three months. CPRF's other two staff members helped with administrative duties. Arnold Worldwide also recruited more than 400 volunteers to assist with the production of TV, radio, and print ads.



* Stakeholder Participation

CPRF's voluntary board of directors, comprised of senior business and community leaders, and a professional advisory board of senior Canadian researchers provided input throughout the campaign development process. Ad agency Arnold Worldwide developed the campaign creative and Warwick Public Relations helped with the public/media relations aspects of the campaign, also for free.



* Decision-Making Process

CPRF board members reserved the right to approve or veto campaign-related activities and materials, including the creative. However, it was one board member and Judy Hills who worked closely with the creative agency on a regular basis.



* Data Gathering and Interpretation

A pre-campaign survey was conducted in October 2002 by Thompson Lightstone. The questions were added to an omnibus survey. The data that was collected from the survey was reported to Arnold Worldwide and informed development of the creative. Due to limited resources, CPRF did not gather any other data.



~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *



III Step Two: Revisit Health Promotion Strategy



CPRF's Project Breakthrough included the following three components:

1. Communications Campaign

2. Fundraising Campaign

3. Political Support Initiative



The communications campaign was proposed to heighten interest in the plight of the mentally ill and the discrimination they face in society. It was hoped that this increased interest would provide "a window of opportunity" to boost fundraising for psychiatric research and increase political support for the issue.



~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *



IV Step Three: Audience Analysis and Segmentation



The audience was chosen based on CPRF's 22 years of experience as well as opinions obtained from organizations like the Heart and Stroke Foundation, Canadian Cancer Society, and other agencies that have experience with stigma-related advertising.



CPRF volunteers and staff have encountered many examples of stigma such as

* employees fearing to reveal an illness to their human resource professionals,

* parents referring to a child's suicide as "an accident,"

* companies preferring to be listed as "anonymous" on a list of donors to mental-illness related causes,

* mental-illness facility/organization employees preferring not to list their places of employment on home rental applications,

* mental health organizations being denied office space, and

* resistance by medical students to specialize in psychiatric research.



CPRF volunteers and staff also feel that most Canadian adults have little knowledge about mental illness and hold stereotypical images of the mentally ill in their minds (for example, loonies wandering the streets in their pajamas yelling at newspaper boxes). CPRF felt that the presence of this stigma was limiting donations for psychiatric research. Although most donors to CPRF are older adults, because of the wide range of audiences affected by the types of stigma listed above the target audience chosen for the campaign was the general public over age 25.



Due to time and financial limitations, no audience analysis data was collected.



~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *



V Step Four: Communication Inventory



Following a casual meeting between Arnold Worldwide and one of CPRF's board members, Arnold Worldwide agreed to develop the creative and assist with implementation, for free. The staff of Arnold Worldwide used their existing relationships to acquire free services and advertising time/space.



~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *



VI Step Five: Set Communication Objectives



Individual

* To decrease the stigma associated with mental illness in the general public over age 25 years

* To increase awareness in the general public over age 25 that mental illness research is severely underfunded

* To increase awareness about CPRF in the general public over age 25 so that public will be aware of CPRF when asked for donations



Network

* To increase the number of students in medical school who are involved in psychiatry research



Societal

* To increase government support for increasing financial resources in the healthcare system for the mentally ill



~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *



VII Step Six: Select Channels and Vehicles



CPRF implemented a multimedia campaign that included print, radio, and TV ads. Other printed campaign materials included brochures and press kits. The campaign resources including the audio-visual ads were available electronically on the CPRF website at http://www.cprf.ca.



~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *



VIII Step Seven: Combine and Sequence



The campaign was launched during the week of October 14, 2002, to build on Mental Illness Awareness Week, which was the week prior. Since media airtime and space were donated, CPRF could not follow a fixed timeline. The ads appeared as and when space and time were available.



Table 1: Campaign Timeline, is available in the PDF version of the case study at http://www.thcu.ca/infoandresources/ohccasestudies.htm.



~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *



IX Step Eight: Develop Messages



CPRF decided on the following key elements to be included in the campaign message:



What

a. Mental illnesses are at "epidemic proportions" in Canada; in fact one in five suffers from a mental disorder. In any given year, 37.5% of Canadians suffer from some form of mental disorder.

b. One in eight Canadians will be hospitalized for mental illness at some point in his/her life.

c. Mental illness is a legitimate medical condition, not a character flaw. However, the stigma and discrimination attached to mental illnesses create a situation where mental illness is kept in the closet.

d. Mental health care accounts for as much as 16% of healthcare costs, yet only five million of the 500 million dollars allocated for medical research goes to psychiatric research.

e. Many mental illnesses currently respond well to medical intervention.

f. Other medical interventions are possible and needed.



So what

a. Uncontrolled/untreated mental illness comes with enormous costs to the economy and society. Health Canada estimates the annual economic burden of mental illness to be more than $13 billion per year.

b. Given the prevalence, you, or someone you know may now or in the future be challenged by a mental illness. Nearly 4,000 Canadians die by suicide each year.



Now what

a. Acknowledge that, like any serious affliction, people with mental illness can't get better by themselves.

b. Donate to the Canadian Psychiatric Research Foundation to help research mental illnesses in the hope of finding cures.



~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *



X Step Nine: Develop Identity



The logo of the CPRF appeared on all campaign resources.



~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *



XI Step Ten: Production



CPRF provided Arnold Worldwide with information about mental illness statistics, opinions on target audiences, and creative ideas obtained from organizations such as Heart and Stroke Foundation, Canadian Cancer Society, and other agencies that had experience with stigma-related advertising.



In addition to the information noted above in Step 8, CPRF produced the following creative brief:

Creative needs to have high impact and be emotionally evocative

a. to challenge people's existing perceptions by juxtaposing judgmental views about mental illness with the compassionate and understanding attitudes that surround other devastating afflictions such as being hit by a car, cancer or heart disease

b. to get media to want to donate quality space/air time

c. to garner pro bono support (i.e., people wanting to get involved for personal reasons)

d. so that production suppliers want to be associated with creative and donate their time/resources

e. to stand out from PSA clutter

f. to get public relations coverage



The above needs were translated by Arnold Worldwide into the creative idea "Mental illness is a real disease so why don't we treat it seriously." The campaign slogans, "Mental illness is real. Help find a cure" and "Imagine if we treated everyone like we treat the mentally ill," combined with the visual elements of the creative, were developed to communicate this creative idea. The tone was intended to be informed, provocative, challenging, unpatronizing, and empathetic.



In order to provide media with the flexibility to use the campaign lines within any available time and space, Arnold Worldwide produced three different print ads, a 30-second and a 60-second TV ad, and three different radio commercials, each with a 30-second and 60-second version. All the campaign materials were produced during August and September 2002 for the October launch following Mental Awareness Week. Print ads were also produced in French. Arnold Worldwide also recruited production companies, talent, and other suppliers.



~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *



XII Step Eleven: Implementation



The multimedia campaign consisting of print, television, and radio ads was launched nationwide the week of October 14, 2002, in 43 radio stations, popular TV channels, and consumer and business magazines. The French print ads also went out in October. The date was chosen to build on Mental Illness Awareness Week, which started on October 7.



Since media space and airtime were donated, ad placement was determined by individual channels and stations as space/time was available. Arnold Worldwide coordinated the ad placements with the help of the board of directors. There was an initial surge in the placement of ads from October to December 2002, after which the ads continued to run in assorted magazines throughout 2003 and 2004 as space and airtime were available. The campaign appeared not only in Canada but also in few US states. A list of organizations who donated pro bono space and time is available in the PDF version of the case study at http://www.thcu.ca/infoandresources/ohccasestudies.htm.



Warwick Public Relations developed a public/media relations strategy in order to maximize the advertising message through editorial coverage. Press kits that were distributed to media during the week of Oct 14 included a news release, backgrounder on CPRF, FAQ sheet on CPRF, fundraising information, samples of print ads, and a bio on the executive chairperson on the CPRF board. CPRF also provided speakers for interviews on radio and TV and for editorials, articles, etc. Interviews were requested by the media stations in response to the media releases. Profiles of mental illnesses were produced by members of CPRF's Professional Advisory Board and Arnold Worldwide. Illnesses like postpartum depression, schizophrenia, and other mood disorders were profiled as requested.



Table 3: Campaign Overview, is available in the PDF version of the case study at http://www.thcu.ca/infoandresources/ohccasestudies.htm.



~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *



XIII Step Twelve: Evaluation



* Formative Evaluation

In October 2002, Thompson Lightstone did a pre-campaign survey of attitudes and awareness by adding questions to an omnibus survey. The report went to Arnold Worldwide and informed the creative development. Due to limited time and budgets, additional formative evaluation activities like creative pre-testing were limited to obtaining opinions from the Heart and Stroke Foundation, Canadian Cancer Society, the Rick Hansen Institute, and other organizations that had experience with stigma-related advertising. CPRF approached these organizations for general advice as well as input on the appropriateness of the ads. The organizations understood what CPRF wanted to do but cautioned that the ads might get negative responses.



* Process Evaluation

The public response to the campaign was mostly favorable but in some cases negative. For instance, Canadian Cancer Society wrote to CPRF on behalf of one of their members who felt offended at the comparison between cancer and mental illness. On a similar note, CBC refused to run the TV commercial calling it very "violent." However, the overall outcomes were positive (please see the section on summative evaluation below). CPRF tried to use Nielson ratings (which estimate audience numbers for TV programs) to determine when and where the ads were screened. However, detailed information was not available. Nielson confirmed that CPRF ads were also running in few US states, including New Jersey, Washington, and Ohio. Since November 2002, the following groups and individuals within the mental illness/health sector have called to congratulate CPRF and to request permission to use the campaign in their efforts to eradicate stigma. Even emergency room personnel in British Columbia and Ontario contacted CPRF to ask for ads that could be placed in emergency rooms to boost morale of psychiatric nurses and to reinforce that administering emergency services to a mentally ill patient is critical. More detail on this process is available in the PDF version of the case study at http://www.thcu.ca/infoandresources/ohccasestudies.htm.



* Summative Evaluation

The most important outcome of the campaign was that CPRF started receiving phone calls and emails pledging support and donations as soon as the campaign was launched. In addition, Kaleidovision conducted a post-campaign research study in June 2003 using both qualitative and quantitative methods to determine campaign effectiveness. The study was done pro bono. Kaleidovision assembled 79 (74% female; 26% male) voluntary participants for the study; 49% were under 40 years of age while the rest were 40 or above. Results of these studies are available in the PDF version of the case study at http://www.thcu.ca/infoandresources/ohccasestudies.htm.



~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *



XIV For More Information



For more information about Project Breakthrough, please contact



Judy Hills

Executive Director

Canadian Psychiatric Research Foundation

2 Carlton Street, Suite 1007

Toronto, ON M5B 1J3

Phone: 416.351.7757

Fax: 416.351.7765

[email protected]

http://www.cprf.ca



For more information about THCU's Case Study Series, please visit http://www.thcu.ca/infoandresources/ohccasestudies.htm or contact [email protected].